the voice

We each have quirks that make us different, unique, and distinct. Some of them are physical, while others are personality-based. For me, my most obvious quirk is my height. I’m short for a 33-year-old man (5’4″), and as is expected for a short child, I had my share of bullies and critics. While those days are long done, their words and actions stay with me, all these years later. Scars and souvenirs.

I’ve always been different in other ways. My personality is the most rare of the 16 Jungian types, and I’m also an Empath and a highly sensitive person. What this all means is that I’m very good at reading people, especially on an emotional level. It also means that negativity lingers more loudly in my head. Between my bullies, relationships with narcissists, friends who’ve left me at the side of the road, and other mistakes along the way, it’s the critics whose words stay more closely at the fore than the people who support me and push me to chase my daydreams.

As an INFJ and an Empath, I’m very adept at reading other people, but it’s difficult for me to distinguish between my own emotions and someone else’s. Whether it’s my best friend, a coworker, stranger on the street, or someone on social media, it’s hard to tune out the signals being broadcast to me, because the signals often become the narrative.

My story isn’t unique. I know more than a few people who’ve dealt with similar troubles and struggle to remain above water as reminders of the bridges long burned continue to surface among the cinders. The words and actions of our critics become our perspectives because no matter how much help we have, no matter how many years have passed, no matter how long-healed the wounds may be, we have no choice but to see the world differently.

Most of us do not own our perspectives or experiences; even those of us with only minor damage. They come from the words and experiences of others. We’re taught to see things through the eyes of others and accept them as fact, as a sort of half-honest empathy . Understand where I’m coming from, and you’ll understand me better, they tell us.That’s a legitimate statement, but at what point are we allowed to see the world through our own eyes? At what point will they see where we’re coming from?

Allow yourself to hear your own inner voice. It, not the voices of days gone by, is the most important voice. Let it speak for, and through, you. Let it give you back your strength and your power. Listen to it closely. It will not lead you astray.

We all have a voice in our head. The question is, is it yours, or is it someone else’s?

Some people hear their own inner voices with great clearness, and they live by what they hear. Such people become crazy… Or they become legend.

-Jim Harrison

Advertisements

One response to “the voice

  1. I appreciate this so much. Like you, I’m an INFJ and “it’s difficult for me to distinguish between my own emotions and someone else’s.” I’m so aware of other people’s thoughts and feelings that I sometimes don’t know whose I’m living by, mine or there’s.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s